Effect of water salinity on tomato under drip irrigation.

Book Title: NA
Year Published: 2005
Month Published: NA
Author: Agrawal, P. N. ; Purohit, R. C. ; Jaspal, Singh
Book Group Author: NA
Abstract:

Salinity is almost a universal threat in the arid and semiarid areas where irrigation waters typically contain most dissolved salts. In such areas, irrigation should maintain a slight but nearly continuous downward movement of moisture and salts for excellent short-term salinity control. Localized irrigation system (drip and trickle) is used on a daily or near daily basis at a very low application rate (2-8 litres per h per emitter). An experiment was conducted to study the effect of water salinity on tomato under drip irrigation from November 2001 to April 2002 at CTAE Farm, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Four treatments with three replications were applied. All four treatments were irrigated by drip with 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 dS/m salinity of irrigation water, respectively. The seasonal water requirement of tomato was 27.72 cm in each drip irrigation treatment (T1-T4). Performance of drip irrigation was found to be satisfactory. Emission uniformity, field emission uniformity and statistically uniformity coefficient were found maximum for drip with 1.5 dS/m salinity of irrigation water (T1) and minimum for drip with 3.0 dS/m salinity of irrigation water (T4). This shows that as salinity increases the performance of drip system decreases. Insignificant critical difference was observed in various growth parameters (plant height, plant girth, number of leaves and leaf area) for the first three treatments (drip with 1.5 to 2.5 dS/m salinity of irrigation water) while significant critical difference was observed in these parameters between the first three and last one treatments. From yield point of view, significant critical difference was found among all irrigation treatments. As salinity of irrigation water increases tomato yield decreases. The quality parameters of tomato (fruit girth and fruit weight) was found superior for drip with 1.5 dS/m salinity of irrigation water while it was found inferior for drip with 3.0 dS/m salinity of irrigation water. As salinity of irrigation water increases, fruit girth and fruit weight decrease. Water use efficiency was found to be maximum (675.56 kg/ha-cm) for drip with 1.5 dS/m salinity of irrigation water and minimum (192.50 kg/ha-cm) for drip with 3.0 dS/m salinity of irrigation water. Thus it is concluded that as salinity of irrigation water increases, water use efficiency decreases.

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Volume: NA
Number: NA
Journal: NA
Journal ISO: NA
Organization: NA
Publisher: NA
ISBN: NA
ISSN: 8179060993
DOI: NA
Keywords:

crop quality, crop yield, equipment performance, girth,irrigation scheduling, irrigation systems, irrigation water, leaf area,leaves, plant height, saline water, salinity, tomatoes, trickleirrigation, water quality, water requirements, water use efficiency,India, Rajasthan, Lycopersicon esculentum, South Asia, Asia, DevelopingCountries, Commonwealth of Nations, Lycopersicon, Solanaceae, Solanales,dicotyledons, angiosperms, Spermatophyta, plants, eukaryotes, India,salt water, water composition and quality, Horticultural Crops (FF003)(New March 2000), Plant Morphology and Structure (FF030), Plant WaterRelations (FF062), Plant Production (FF100), Soil Water Management(Irrigation and Drainage) (JJ800) (Revised June 2002) [formerly SoilWater Management], Agricultural and Forestry Equipment (General) (NN400)

Source: EBSCO
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