Water economization in summer greengram (Vigna radiata var radiata) as influenced by irrigation regimes and land configurations.

Book Title: NA
Year Published: 2008
Month Published: NA
Author: Idnani, L. K. ; Gautam, H. K.
Book Group Author: NA
Abstract:

The field experiment during the summer seasons of 2005 and 2006 was conducted in New Delhi, India, to economize the water use in greengram (Vigna radiata var. radiata) by means of irrigation regimes and land configurations. Irrigation at 120 mm cummulative pan evaporation recorded significantly the highest plant height (36.6 cm), leaves/plant (15.4), leaf area index (3.2), nodules/plant (24.4), shoot dry weight (8.6 g/plant), total dry weight (12.4 g/plant), pod length (7.1 cm), pods/plant (16.2), grains/pod (8.9), grain weight/pod (0.41 g), grain yield (1.37 tonnes/ha), straw yield (3.08 tonnes/ha), protein yield (302.1 kg/ha) and total N, P and K uptake (127.8, 13.6 and 77.8 kg/ha, respectively). Irrigation at 200 mm cumulative pan evaporation recorded significantly the highest root length (22.3 cm), root dry weight/plant (4.37 g), root:shoot ratio (0.75) and available N (76.2 kg/ha) and available P (20.1 kg/ha) in soil at harvest. Irrigation at 80 mm cumulative pan evaporation recorded the highest consumptive use of water and rate of water use (36.22 cm and 5.33 mm/day, respectively) and irrigation at 200 mm cumulative pan evaporation resulted in the highest water-use efficiency (44.75 kg/ha cm) and the lowest consumptive use of water and rate of water use (24.8 cm and 3.6 mm/day respectively). In 0-15 cm soil depth the highest soil moisture was extracted under irrigation at 80 mm cumulative pan evaporation (18.95%). Furrow irrigated raised bed system recorded significantly the highest biometric observations except root:shoot ratio, yield attributes except pod length and test weight, grain and straw yields (1.40 and 3.05 tonnes/ha respectively), protein yield (315.8 kg/ha) and total N, P and K uptake/plant. Zero tillage resulted in significantly the highest available N (79.4 kg/ha) and available P (18.9 kg/ha) in soil at harvest. The highest consumptive use of water, rate of water use and water use efficiency (31.34 cm, 4.61 mm/day and 44.72 kg/ha cm respectively) were recorded under furrow irrigated raised bed system. From 0-15 cm soil depth, the highest soil moisture (76.56%) was extracted in zero tillage, followed by ridge side sowing and irrigation (71.42%). Pods/plant, grain yield and total N uptake were recorded significantly the highest with irrigation at 120 mm cumulative pan evaporation in combination with furrow irrigated raised bed system. Net return and benefit:cost ratio were the highest with irrigation at 120 mm cumulative pan evaporation (Rs 9 498/ha and 0.97 respectively). Similarly furrow irrigated raised bed system recorded the highest net return and benefit cost ratio (Rs 10 177/ha and 1.03 respectively).

Pages: 214 - 219
URL: http:////0-search.ebscohost.com.catalog.library.colostate.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,cpid&custid=s4640792&db=lah&AN=20083092368&site=ehost-live
Volume: 78
Number: 3
Journal: Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences
Journal ISO: NA
Organization: NA
Publisher: NA
ISBN: NA
ISSN: 0019-5022
DOI: NA
Keywords:

cost benefit analysis, crop yield, furrow irrigation, greengram, irrigation, irrigation requirements, leaf area index, leaves,mineral uptake, mung beans, nitrogen balance, no-tillage, nodules,phosphorus, plant height, plant water relations, pods, potassium,protein content, root shoot ratio, seed weight, straw, water useefficiency, yield components, Delhi, India, Vigna radiata, India, SouthAsia, Asia, Developing Countries, Commonwealth of Nations, Vigna,Papilionoideae, Fabaceae, Fabales, dicotyledons, angiosperms,Spermatophyta, plants, eukaryotes, LAI, New Delhi, no-tillage systems,watering, zero tillage, Field Crops (FF005) (New March 2000), PlantNutrition (FF061), Plant Water Relations (FF062), Plant Production(FF100), Soil Water Management (Irrigation and Drainage) (JJ800)(Revised June 2002) [formerly Soil Water Management]

Source: EBSCO
Series:
Series Number:
Document Type:
Subject Category: