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Udall, Heinrich Announce $1.1 Million Grant For NMSU Sustainable Agriculture Research

July 24, 2018

U.S. Senators Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) announced that New Mexico State University (NMSU) Agriculture Extension Program has received a $1.18 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The Resilient Agroecosystems in a Changing Climate award will fund research into the best strategies for arid land farmers and ranchers in the Southern Great Plains in Union County, New Mexico, Las Animas, Colorado, and Cimarron County, Oklahoma to adapt to times of drought.

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Source: KRWG/NPR By: U.S. SENATOR TOM UDALL (D-N.M.) & U.S. SENATOR MARTIN HEINRICH

Incentivizing Groundwater Management

July 20, 2018

How can organizations finance the changes needed to preserve groundwater? In Brazil, where drought has left the countryside parched, farmers are being paid to improve infrastructure and implement groundwater preservation techniques.

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Source: Forester Daily News By: Laura Sanchez

Agriculture: DIY field imaging system

July 18, 2018

Farmers and plant breeders can now build their own automated field camera track system to collect data on dynamic plant traits, such as crop lodging and movement, as it’s happening in the field to help reduce losses in crop yield.

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Source: Science Daily By: University of Minnesota

Farmers conserve together

July 6, 2018

The data on saving soil and protecting water quality is clear. Conservation practices work. However, they take time and money, and other priorities can get in the way. The Root River Field to Stream Partnership gathered data, but more importantly, it engaged with growers and encouraged conversations among growers that led to positive changes.

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Source: Corn + Soybean Digest By: Jim Ruen

In India, swapping crops could save water and improve nutrition

July 4, 2018

India will need to feed approximately 394 million more people by 2050. Meanwhile, many of its regions are chronically water-stressed, and nutrient deficiencies are widespread — 30 percent of Indians or more are anemic. But a new study shares a brighter outlook: replacing some rice with less thirsty crops could dramatically reduce water demand in India, while also improving nutrition.

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Source: Science Daily By: The Earth Institute, Columbia University